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Richlab Power Outage Tuesday Aug 30 06:00-08:00

Richardson Labs 

·         Tuesday, August 31st ,  2021 – 6 AM – 8 AM – Shutdown of all electrical power to disconnect rental generator and go back on utility power.

 

RichLab Power Outage Monday Aug 30th 07:30-10:00

RichLab Power Outage Monday Aug 30th 07:30-10:00

Richardson Labs 

·         Monday, August 30th, 2021 - 7:30 AM - 10 AM – Shutdown of all electrical power to hook up rental generator. 

·         Tuesday, August 31st ,  2021 – 6 AM – 8 AM – Shutdown of all electrical power to disconnect rental generator and go back on utility power.

**Staff may enter Richardson labs after 10 am on Monday August 30th.**

Dr. Jeannie Callum

Dr. Jeannie Callum - CIHR Grant

 

Dr. Callum is a Professor in the Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine. Her funded research project is titled: Prospective, multicentre, randomized, parallel-control, superiority study comparing administration of clotting factor concentrates with a standard massive hemorrhage protocol in severely bleeding trauma patients.

When a patient is severely injured the most common cause of death is uncontrollable bleeding, which in part, results from loss of clotting factors in the blood. For the last 70 years, plasma (liquid part of blood) has been the most common treatment used. In the last 10 years, plasma has been replaced with manufactured and virtually inactivated safer clotting factor concentrates at some hospitals and is standard of care in many European hospitals. Dr. Callum’s research will compare these two treatments in 450 severely injured patients at 11 hospitals in Canada. If the clotting factor concentrates are shown to improve patient outcomes, the new strategy would be a major safety advance in trauma care.

Dr. Lois Mulligan

Dr. Lois Mulligan - CIHR Grant

Dr. Lois Mulligan

Dr. Mulligan is a Professor in the Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine and a Principal Investigator at Queen’s Cancer Research Institute. Her funded research project is titled: Investigating the Regulation of RET Receptor-Mediated Perineural Invasion and Metastasis.

The RET protein is a cell surface molecule that helps convey messages from outside the cell as part of its normal roles in human development. However, in some cancers, such as tumours of the pancreas, RET can help tumour cells to spread by following a trail of signals that leads them to move toward and along nerves that lie close to the tumour. Dr. Mulligan’s research aims to better understand the mechanisms that contribute to RET's roles in cancer invasion and spread. She will identify the key protein interactions and signals RET requires to promote invasion and also determine whether blocking or reducing these signals can prevent cancer invasion and reduce the pain it causes.